Craig carries… an Anglo Saxon Pendant

As part of his job our Collections Manager, Craig Bowen, often transports fascinating historical artefacts between our stores and museums. In the past these have included items such as Zulu spears, priceless pendants, machine guns and a mummified cat. We’d like to bring you an exclusive sneak peek at some of these items before they go on display.

This week Craig has been carrying…an Anglo Saxon Pendant.

Anglo Saxon Pendant

Dating from the 6th or 7th Century AD, this openwork circular gold pendant is a fine example of its kind and was used on many items of clothing and jewellery during the Early-Anglo-Saxon period.

Measuring only a few centimetres in length with a spiral pattern at its centre known as a tetraskele, this small pendant was found locally by a metal detectorist near Manston in Kent. It was later purchased through the Portable antiquities scheme by the Friends of Canterbury Museums and will shortly go on display at the Beaney.

Alog Saxon Pendant

Kent has a rich array of Anglo- Saxon finds dating from the fifth to the eighth centuries. During this time Kent was an independent, wealthy kingdom with continental connections. At first it was a pagan warrior society but in 597 St Augustine was sent by Pope Gregory to bring Christianity to England, and was welcomed in Canterbury by King Ethelbert and his Frankish Queen, Bertha. The Kingdom of Kent was distinguished for outstanding craftsmanship in jewellery, metalwork and glass.

Alongside the pendant The Beaney houses many examples of such craftsmanship in its collections, such as this Silver disc brooch, set with garnets and decorated with cloisonné work and gold wire filigree. This beautiful piece was found at Kings Field, Faversham by John Brent (1808 – 1882), a humanitarian activists, author and antiquarian who was honorary curator of Canterbury Museum.

Anglo Saxons

 

You can find more Anglo-Saxon items on display in the Explorers & Collectors Gallery upstairs at The Beaney House of Art & Knowledge and at Canterbury Heritage Museum.

 

Advertisements

Let us know what you think

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s